Go Back   AC3D Forums > General > AC3D General
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 2nd February 2006, 11:34 AM   #1
Merrie
Member
Expert member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: PA
Posts: 82
Default Respected 3D Software

I've heard alot of talk on game forums about 'respected' 3D software and they give you the strong impression unless you use 3DS Max or Maya getting a job in a well known game company is not possible.

I would appreciate thoughts on this subject, is it true or not? If learning a quality 3D program (such as AC3D) still gives you what you need to design the quality artwork that they are looking for does it matter?

Thanks!
Merrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd February 2006, 06:30 PM   #2
Dennis
Senior Member
Professional user
 
Dennis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 899
Default Re: Respected 3D Software

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merrie
I've heard alot of talk on game forums about 'respected' 3D software and they give you the strong impression unless you use 3DS Max or Maya getting a job in a well known game company is not possible.
I don't know what game companies look for specifically (depends upon the company, I suppose), but there are certainly standards within a lot of companies that employ 3D artists that you should be versed in a certain software program(s). I would imagine this requirement sometimes exists because the company has deadlines or budgetary constraints that wouldn't accomodate hiring folks that needed to be trained to use their preferred software.

Of course, that being said, I would imagine that if your work in 3D Package A was very promising or exactly what they were looking for, they should be willing to give you the time to ramp up in 3D Package B, circumstances allowing...

Even further still, some larger companies/studios use their own proprietary software, so I imagine they'd be more interested in your raw ability versus your knowledge of a particular piece of software.

Just curious, as you dropped the word "design" here ---- were you looking for a design position, or an art position? If you're looking for a design position, it probably wouldn't matter much which packages you used, but I also understand design positions are a bit harder to come by
Dennis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th February 2006, 03:31 PM   #3
wsimike
Junior Member
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 22
Default Re: Respected 3D Software

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merrie
I've heard alot of talk on game forums about 'respected' 3D software and they give you the strong impression unless you use 3DS Max or Maya getting a job in a well known game company is not possible.
I don't know what game companies look for specifically (depends upon the company, I suppose), but there are certainly standards within a lot of companies that employ 3D artists that you should be versed in a certain software program(s). I would imagine this requirement sometimes exists because the company has deadlines or budgetary constraints that wouldn't accomodate hiring folks that needed to be trained to use their preferred software.

Of course, that being said, I would imagine that if your work in 3D Package A was very promising or exactly what they were looking for, they should be willing to give you the time to ramp up in 3D Package B, circumstances allowing...

Even further still, some larger companies/studios use their own proprietary software, so I imagine they'd be more interested in your raw ability versus your knowledge of a particular piece of software.

Just curious, as you dropped the word "design" here ---- were you looking for a design position, or an art position? If you're looking for a design position, it probably wouldn't matter much which packages you used, but I also understand design positions are a bit harder to come by
Well, it's not a game company related story, but any of you who are familiar with the animated short, "Alien Song" - featuring an alien strutting and lip sync'ing to "I Will Survive" by Gloria Gaynor - there's a story there that sorta parallels what's being asked here.

Basically, Victor Navone, the creator of Alien Song, created that entire short in a program called Hash Animation: Master. It's an alternate, spline-based modeling program and is far from the "standard" in the CG industry. However, based on the strength of his work on that (and some of his other portfolio work), he was hired at Pixar and has contributed to such movies as Finding Nemo, Monsters, Inc, The Incredibles, etc...

So, though knowledge with a company's preferred software is a plus... your abilities as a modeler/animator/artist does carry alot of weight, regardless of what you used. So, if your work absolutely blows away a potential employer and shows that you have solid skills and talent, it's not gonna matter whether the software you used cost $60 or $6000.
wsimike is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:12 PM.


AC3D Forum
(C) Inivis Limited 2020